FULLY Living Strategies When in Constant Pain

FULLY Living Strategies When in Constant Pain

Blue ocean waves with white crest background to post title in dark blue over a transparent white rectangle
teal line drawing of lotus flower

Life with chronic pain can be….well, more than one person can bear at times. But we can, and must, continue on. We can do better than just exist. We can, in fact, thrive in many ways. In order to do that, though, we need to take purposeful steps to manage our pain.

Reach Out to Your Tribe

While living with chronic pain can make one feel alone, the truth is we don’t have to be. Reaching out to your tribe, those that know you and are there for you no matter what, will help you get through those tough moments. Not everyone is up for the task, but those you are closest to will be there through it all.

Being open and honest with them will help them not to feel helpless as they watch you in agony. It’s important, I’ve found, to make sure to educate them right even as you educate yourself on what your condition means. That way they can better support you and know why you may cancel something at the last moment or snap at them when it seems pretty random.

While I do rely on my family and friends, I’ve also created a tribe of those living with chronic illness online that have been a great help. Although our situations may be different, we understand one another very well. The online chronic pain community is very sharing and supportive. Through these groups, I’ve connected with individual chronic illness bloggers who I have learned so much from. They have

Helpful Online Chronic Pain Groups to Join:

These Facebook groups have introduced me to so many wonderful people who live with chronic pain and illness,
too many for me to list all that have positively impacted my wellness journey.

Work to Improve Your Sleep

Loss of sleep has one of the biggest impacts on our ability to manage pain. Those living with pain call loss of sleep due to pain levels painsomnia. Another issue that can steal sleep is side-effects of medication that we take to help better our symptoms. Low Dose Naltrexone that I take is known for causing insomnia. So, learning what affects you and how you can mitigate their effects on your amount and quality of sleep. For example, to combat LDN’s impact on my ability to fall asleep, I take quality CBD oil an hour or so before going to bed.

Improving your sleep is the first thing doctors focus on. It’s important for your overall pain management. I hear your incredulous laughter through the screen. Yes, I know, way easier said than done. However, it’s not impossible to at least get a few more quality winks. I’ve worked to find what helps me.

  • First, I set a goal of sleep by 10:00 pm and up no latter than 7:30 am. I’m not perfect with this, as I’m not with any of my health protocols, and I pay for it every single time I stay up too late.
  • I don’t have visual technology in my bedroom. However, I do use my tablet to play a guided meditation or an audiobook. I have a wonderful Bluetooth eye-mask with earbuds that I wear while listening. It gently holds my eyes close (which sometimes feels like a struggle for me) and keeps out all the light.
  • I use Calm and Insight Timer for guided meditation.
  • I take quality . 25 mg CBD oil that an hour before going to bed.
  • I do some gentle stretches in bed: Supine Windshield Wiper pose, Happy Baby pose, Eagle Arm pose sitting or laying down, and Supine Spinal Twist to name a few. Basically, I do whatever feels good.
  • I breathe, purposefully, using belly breathing. I breathe gently through my nose in 4-6 counts, hold for 4 counts, release for 8 counts, hold for four and continue. Often, I place my right hand on my chest and my left hand on my stomach.
  • If all else fails, I get up and move to the couch. I try to not feel panicked because it’s been my pattern to struggle a couple of nights and then sleep for a few.

These are easy to do in bed as long as my husband isn’t in it!

Move

Extensive research shows that movement helps curb chronic pain; it is especially good for those living with Fibromyalgia. When I was in Physical therapy, I learned that by doing 20-minutes of brisk walking brought about immediate pain quelling as well as raised my mood and energy. My PT said that if I did this consistently, I would begin to notice that if I started to walk, the endorphins would kick in earlier because the body was used to this pattern and would anticipate the need for more. These endorphins are your body’s pain relievers and anti-depressants. Make sure, though, to keep your exercise within pacing levels that match your needs (see below post). Often gentler forms of exercise are best such as Tai Chi, walking, and yoga. Always let your doctor know what you’re doing, getting approval based on your condition.

Find an exercise that you enjoy. For me, I love getting into nature. Walking, kayaking, and swimming are some of my favorites during the warmer seasons. In the winter here in Michigan, I have to contend with snow, but I have discovered snowshoeing is really enjoyable and provides support with poles. Inside movement for me is yoga and elliptical and when I can, swimming at the local gym’s pool that is warm because it’s used for therapy, too. At the same community gym, I was able to try beginning Tai Chi, and I would like to try more of that.

When I say yoga, there are styles that work for me and styles that actually hurt. I’ve come to really enjoy and appreciate chair yoga, Yin yoga, restorative yoga, and gentle Hatha yoga. Chair yoga allows me to have support yet get needed stretches where my muscles can relax. Yin yoga allows me to hold a pose while slowly getting deeper into the stretch. Restorative is luscious, in that I use all sorts of props to support my body to again allow my muscles to let go. Hatha is more what people consider the “routine” of yoga, but I really focus on diaphragmatic breathing while I’m doing it. I’ve recently had to be careful with moving up and down quickly due to getting dizzy. I subscribe to Gaia.com which offers all sorts of levels, styles, and lengths.

Yoga can be done anywhere and doesn’t have to have a mat.
For me it’s about moving and stretching while focusing on my breathing.

Related Post:

Alternative Treatments

Every one of us is different. Our body chemistries and reasons for our chronic pain make it impossible to have a once size fits all treatment. So, unfortunately we need to try things out to see what will work for us. I suggest doing something for a few weeks (without any other changes in your management protocol) to see if it actually helps.

One supplement that helps many people with chronic pain is turmeric, but for me, I really didn’t find that it made any difference in my pain symptoms. Alternative treatments like myofascial release and massage, meditation, ACT counseling, and daily supplements like magnesium, quality CBD oil, B12, and SAM-e have helped me with not only lessening the level of pain but helping increase my energy level, reduce brain fog, and up my overall mood. For me, the biggest help I’ve had has come from an off-label prescription medication called Low Dose Naltrexone. I’ve been on it for four months, and it’s amazing the difference between the before and after.

There are many alternative treatments for pain relief and some are total frauds. It’s hard as one who struggles with chronic pain to not voraciously try everything, spending precious money that we can’t afford. I’ve fallen for a few duds. To avoid that, I now only try those things that have been recommended by those who have really shown to know what they’re talking about, and I do much more research. In the future, I do have a few things I want to try: FAB treatments (see post below), reflexology (probably doing it on myself via video tutorials as I do for the myofascial release), a physical therapist trained myofascial release, and acupuncture (which my insurance covers for 10 visits).

Chronic pain can be a life-impacting, blunting your spirit and your ability to enjoy life. However, we can take action steps that will help us manage the pain so that we can enjoy FULLY living our lives despite the constant pain.


What pain management protocols have been most helpful for you? Have you tried any that I’ve listed that didn’t work for you?



Come So Far! Last Summer to This

Come So Far! Last Summer to This

As you probably have guessed, I am not a trained medical health professional. What I am is a mom, a mimi, a retired teacher, a lover of nature and of music, as well as, someone living with chronic illnesses. I share my journey to provide some insight and hopefully ideas that may be helpful to others dealing with similar issues. Always, consult with your doctor before trying anything new.

Background of teal water and rocks, image of me smiling wearing a blue baseball cap and backpack below it an image of me, obviously in pain, wet teal washcloth covering my forhead. White Font for title: Come So Far Last Summer to This
In the first photo, summer 2020, I was able to go hiking w/camping overnight.
In the below image, summer 2019, I was having withdrawal symptoms from going off of Cymbalta.

July 13, 2019

Me, in bed, wearing my grey comfy hoody and a cool, wet washcloth over my forehead.  I'm in visible pain.
Withdrawal from Cymbalta, after taking it for only 6 months at 20 mg, was three months of H#@!#$.

This was a very low time for me. The year prior had brought me to my bed which then lead to a diagnosis. The only option I was given to have relief from the pain and other devastating symptoms of Fibromyalgia was to start on Cymbalta. While it did help me, it had side effects and long-term addiction that I was not willing to deal with. And so, I stopped taking it.

“I have not felt this bad since I had viral meningitis (I’m not as bad as that time in the emergency room, but man, it’s reminding me of it). Since the purpose of this blog is for me to record my true journey (for healing through the writing and remembering where I’ve been) and to possibly help others who are dealing with Fibromyalgia, I’ve decided to write this (as I can today because doing anything and nothing are both really difficult right now).”

Painfullyliving.com I FEEL LIKE @#$#%

I mostly followed the doctor’s directions for weaning off of Cymbalta. However, I’ve since learned that I’m very affected by any medication (OTC, herbal, or prescription), and so, now I know that what everyone else considers easy will not be for me.

Talking to the doctor mid-withdrawal, he said that I could have taken it every other day at the 10 mg before going completely off. Unfortunately, by then I was more than a month in, so it didn’t make sense to me to start taking it againnto help with the weaning off.

A New Me

Me, smiling, wearing a pink tank top and blue baseball cap.  Behind me, my husband, grinning, wearing a grey t-shirt with his sun glasses hanging down.  This was our first hike in a couple of years.  I finally felt well enough to participate.
First time backpacking since I became sick. It was a wonderful two days.

July 2020

This July has brought me back to myself and to the joys of summer that I had missed so much. Certainly, I’m having to pace more than I used to and be cognizant of what my body is telling me. I now must take care of myself. If I don’t, then I will have a day or more where my body will hold me down to attend to rest, hydration, nutrition, meditation, stretching, myofacial release, sleep, etc.

My family, friends, and myself have come to understand that I will do things in smaller chunks over a longer period of time. And while that was not at all how I had functioned prior to developing Fibromyalgia (non-stop go without eat, sleep, etc. to get something done), we all have come to know I can now plan and participate within my wellness protocol.

Wander Woman Camping Trip

It was wonderful connecting with friends, even during COVID.
We each had quarantined before hand and we didn’t come in contact with others while we camped at a lovely state park on Lake Michigan.
This was my first such trip since developing Fibromyalgia in June of 2018.

During the second week of July, I was able to camp for a few days, adding in a short hike and swim each day, with my friend group we lovingly call Wander Women. I was able to show them myself protocol; they were especially interested in my making a solution with distilled water and LDN pill.

I ended up needing to go home a day earlier than the rest. While I was doing pretty well, I could tell that one more night on the thin sleeping pad was going to be one night too long. My friends readily understood why I had to say goodbye. However, we made plans for them to visit me at my house (outside only and taking the same precautions) later in the summer.

We hiked in 5-miles to find a wonderful spot to set up camp for the night.
We saw no one but three women passing by on the trail during the two days on the river trail.

Two Day Hike and Camp Trip for Two

My husband, who had just gotten back from a week of hiking Pictured Rocks in northern Michigan, was quick to set up an overnight hike/camp trip on the North Country Trail about an hour’s drive north of us for the last week of July. After my camping and hiking experience with the Wander Women, I felt that I might be up to doing it. However, it had been 3-summers ago since I last did such a trip.

While I was useless in helping with the preparation (too worn out after having a wonderful sleepover with our granddaughter), I was excited to see if I would be able to carry a pack, hike, and sleep in a tent with a pretty thin mat between me and Mother Earth.

What a wonderful trip! I felt so grateful and energized by being in the woods. I will admit, however, that I didn’t sleep well. We will be replacing the thin mats for the next time.

We’ve decided that hiking to a spot, setting up camp, and then hiking from that base will be our way of going from now on. That provides enough chance to rest and recuperate, and it isn’t as difficult to hike since we don’t have the pack on all the time. In the past, we would hike to a spot, set up camp, make dinner, etc, and in the morning pack everything up to be on our way to the next camp site on down the trail.

Realizing that the energy it takes to one carry all the equipment necessary for camping on our backs for the entire hike as well as energy necessary for the setting up and tearing down each day, we realized that we needed to adjust our expectations and modify our energy output.

By setting up camp in one spot and doing day hikes from there, we could take small day packs with snacks and essentials only for the hike. Kelley carried the heavier quarts of water, so I really had almost no extra weight to carry. Also, using my walking sticks (see my post on Nordic Walking and how it aids those of us living with chronic pain), I was able to do the nine mile hike the first day.

Hiking and wilderness camping is something that inspires my soul. This first trip since developing Fibromyalgia gave me hope that I can participate in such things again. #hiking #fibromyalgia #fullyliving #pacing #knowinglimits

Knowing My Limits

By the time we headed back on the second day, I was definitely hitting my limit. My legs were aching and I was feeling weak and fatigued. However, after getting back to the car, doing some myofascial release, and eating dinner at a restaurant with an outside patio, I felt much better.

Admittedly, when I got back home, I had several down days. I had to rest up and do almost nothing. But, the experience, greatly outweighed taking these days for rest and repair. Hiking and wilderness camping is something that inspires my soul. This first trip since developing Fibromyalgia gave me hope that I can participate in such things again.

Photo taken from our 2-day hike/camp from the rim overlooking the Manistee River.

Looking Back on the Winding Journey I’ve Been On

The past few years have been one of growth and healing, albeit never a straight one. I’m so grateful for all the help and healing that I’ve received from so many: my family and friends, yoga classes, massage therapists, physical therapists, occupational therapists, doctors of a few different sorts, meditation courses, fellow chronic pain bloggers, my counselors, those friends I’ve met in Fibro, LDN, and chronic illness Facebook groups, my Wander Women groups (one from work and one from the town I live in), YouTube videos, text and audio books, music, and so much more.

My New Blog

This is my first blog post on my new website format. I have learned a lot about web design over this last year and have much more to go. I’m feeling proud and excited for what I might do with this new love and skill.

With all of this week filled with hiking, family, and building a new blog, this post will be less pulled together than normal. I just wanted to share the progress that I’ve made. I’m including (from My Recommended Resources page of this site) much of what has helped me this year along with links or further information.

I do believe that it’s all of these things/people/resources that have brought me to where I am today. I’m not naive enough to think that I won’t have many twists and turns and ups and downs (just got diagnosed with a rare deformity of my carotid artery called Fibromuscular Dysplasia-not at all related to Fibromyalgia), but I want to relish where I am right now anyhow. If I’ve learned one thing this past few years (and since COVID-19’s arrival), what will be will be; it’s my choice how I react.

Resources That Have Helped Me:

  • Low Dose Naltrexone (Newest addition-55 days in. Started at 0.25mg and am now up to 2.5mg and still titrating up to find my best dosage amount). Sleeping pretty well without any other help; clear headed most days all day; less pain overall, more energy. My first post: Tentatively Ecstatic: My Experience with LDN Part 1  & my latest post I Did It My Way! One Year of Low Dose Naltrexone
  • CBD/THC 1:1 Oil- This didn’t seem to help with pain, but sure did help me sleep soundly. I was taking .25mg sublingually before bed. I stopped because the LDN seems to be helping with it and my GP expressed issues with it (even though I have a medical marijuana card and it’s now legalized even for recreation in MI). My post: Out of the Rabbit Hole: CBD/THC Oil for Fibromyalgia
  • Meditation: I have continued with meditation after finishing the Palouse Mindfulness 8 week free course online. This is making a big difference for me. My post:The Danger of Distraction: Turning Toward Pain to Eliminate Suffering
  • Yoga and Breathwork: This is an ongoing, continuation practice of 20 years. However, I’m having to learn that my practice looks different now. I had always strived too much to get to that perfect form of a pose often injuring myself in the process. I’m doing much more Restorative, Yin, and slow yoga practices these days. 
  • Supplements: Magnesium Malate/B-12/E/D3
  • OTC: Bayer Back and Body (for headaches and pain) & Low Dose Asprin for FMD
  • Prescription: Vyvanse (I was diagnosed with ADD one year before my FMS diagnosis; I do think that the ADD symptoms, though, are more connected to the FMS issues.) 
  • Hot pad, ice pad, Epsom salt baths, and hot tub.
  • Massage & Myofacial Release: Professional massage & myofascial release, myofacial release @home using foam roller and Yogu Massage Balls, and Rhenpho Massage Gun
  • Gentle cardio: walks, hikes, bike rides, and swimming 
  • 10-week Interdisciplinary Pain Management Program through Mary Free Bed – My Post about this: Just Breath and Other Ways to Rewire the Pain-filled Brain
  • Diet:This is an area where I really hate being deprived. I had given up on dairy, prior to developing Fibromyalgia. However, I finally bit the bullet and have gone Gluten Free (Read my post on how it has greatly helped eliminate my stomach pain: Fibromyalgia: Impact of Going Gluten Free. I don’t eat food with high acidity, very much, mostly because my bladder hurts immediately after. However, I just can’t cut out tomatoes, so I take PRELIEF and OTC for lowering acidity of foods in the bladder. I rarely drink carbonation and don’t drink much caffeine. I tend to lean vegan due to the no-dairy. However, I do eat some poultry, eggs, and fish.

I know that I am so fortunate to be where I am right now in regards to my health. I have friends who live with chronic illnesses that are really struggling right now, especially because of COVID-19. Many who can’t get around due to being very at risk if they were to get the virus. Those who have lost their form of income or don’t have health care. Some are dealing with depression, and others are hurting due to their relationships hitting some very difficult times. You are on my heart. How are you this summer?

Continue Reading:

Fibromyalgia and the Highly Sensitive Person
Guest Post by Jade Bald Jade and I connected via Linkedin when …
Favorite “Alternative” Treatments for Fibromyalgia
u get a diagnosis of fibromyalgia, it can be so confusing as …
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Finding Your Passion: Nourishing the Soul

Finding Your Passion: Nourishing the Soul

Woman resting on a dry bag while writing after backpacking near a lake.
This is going to be a short post.  I just got back from a few days camping with wonderful friends on the shore of Lake Michigan.  This has been planned for a year.  Our group, we fondly call the Wander Woman, started the hiking/camping trips July 2018 when we did a week-long trip to South and North Manitou Islands in Lake Michigan.  My friend, Lisa, reminded me that she noticed my constant massaging during that trip.  It wouldn’t be until November of that year that I fully understood that there was something very wrong with me. 
Related Post: 
I’ve been planning and working towards my goal of spending the week with them.  We were to camp in Canada at Lake Superior Provincial Park. However, the border between Canada and the United States is still closed due to COVID-19. So, instead, we chose a closer state park in that we could drive to.  Not everyone who had originally planned to join us could come: some due to family commitments, one due to the death of her mom (non-virus related), some due to not feeling comfortable in doing so. 
We agreed to be logically safe and trusted that our Wander Woman cohort had been safe prior to camping.  The park was not crowded at all and so we had no issues out on the trails, at the camp, using the restrooms, or on the beach.  We chose to wear masks only inside public places (the restrooms). 
Renewed Passion:
I am so energized after these past few days.  Wonderful conversation with my friends that ignited my imagination and funny bone, as well as a few shared tears, met with empathy and love. The photos will be the rest of my description of the joy that is currently bursting in my heart.
 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
I can’t thank my friends enough for helping me get back my courage to stay in a tent after a day of hiking and swimming.  I have gotten my courage back to do this more often with my husband. I even talked my daughter into doing a short trip with me soon.  My soul is nourished and my passion blazing again.
 
Related Posts:
 
Another Passion Ignited:
 
My blog is ONE-year old now.  I have learned a lot from doing it.  I’ve made friends from across the country and the world.  I’ve learned from other bloggers how to live well with a chronic condition as well as how to blog better.  It, too, ignites my imagination and gives me a purpose that makes me happy.
 
So, when I found out that I was nominated for two WEGO HEALTH Awards, I felt that this passion was also recognized by those who have watched my blog grow and those who I have hopefully helped in some way.  It’s such a wonderful, supportive group that I have found through blogging.  
 
If you are interested in endorsing me via the link below (just being nominated is really amazing), I humbly thank you.  In my post for the end of this next week, I will be sharing out those who have most impacted my wellness journey, so that you, too, can learn from them (and endorse their nominations for WEGO AWARDS) if you should feel led.
 

 

 

I appreciate this time in my life that I am able to live my life fully (filling it with purpose and passion) alongside good friends and my family despite living with Fibromyalgia. I hope that I can help you find that for yourself as well as you journey through this life. 
Becoming Myself Again! My Experience with Low Dose Naltrexone-Part 2

Becoming Myself Again! My Experience with Low Dose Naltrexone-Part 2

Today is my 56th day on Low Dose Naltrexone (LDN).  I wrote about my initial experience after 13 or so days in.  I won’t revisit that, but if you are at all interested in checking into this pain management treatment, I would suggest you read it.  I get into how to go about getting it, how to start it (and issues I had it), where to find support with good and specific information, and why there are not and will never be many research studies about it.

LDN Bringing Me Back

I now feel that I can safely say LDN is bringing me back to myself or the self I want to be. But, let me take a step back because it’s not been a smooth journey and sure has had its major downturns.

Early on, I received the advice that I needed to “Go low and slow”. (See Facebook LDN group)  I didn’t fully get it when it was first said. My doctor ordered the 4.5mg capsules, so I felt that getting to that level-the level that has been most researched for Fibromyalgia(FMS)-the soon was better.  I’ve since learned that there is no optimum level that works for every person.

How Low Dose Naltrexone Works

LDN blocks the opioid receptors of the brain for a few hours.  When this has happened, the brain feels that there haven’t been enough endorphins created in the body, so it produces more. Research has shown that those living with FMS have lower levels of endorphins in our system.  So, when the brain is “tricked” into releasing more endorphins by the LDN blocking off the receptors for 2-4 hours, it actually is creating natural pain relievers and mood booster. Also, the blocking of the receptors makes them more sensitive to the endorphins that have been created, making them more useable and plentiful. 

LDN Science explains how it works, “Since LDN blocks the OGF receptors only for a few hours before it is naturally excreted, what results is a rebound effect; in which both the production and utilization of OGF is greatly increased. Once the LDN has been metabolized, the elevated endorphins produced as a result of the rebound effect can now interact with the more-sensitive and more-plentiful receptors and assist in regulating cell growth and immunity.”  The site goes on to explain that the Rebound Effect lasts for about a day.  However, being every person’s metabolism is different, it can take different dosages with 3mg to 5mg working for most patients. 

When one has low endorphin production, they will experience:

  • long-term pain throughout the body
  • tender spots that hurt when they are touched
  • muscle stiffness
  • fatigue and low energy
  • sleep problems
  • depression

To combat this, doctors often push endorphin-building exercises such as yoga, swimming, and walking.  I  have felt this distinct change from a raise in my endorphins when I was in physical therapy.  When I showed up lethargic, hurting, and down, my PT would get me on the treadmill for 20 minutes at a rate that got my heart pumping.  Every single time, I found that I had way less pain, my mood was improved, and I had energy.  

Less Pain and More Energy

And so, this is the effect that I am finding with LDN.  For a good 7 to 8 hours, at the current dose I’m at, I am experiencing a pain level of 2-3, I have the energy to go for walks, swim, do house projects, write, socialize, etc.  I also have clearer thinking and feel upbeat and motivated.

My Experience

However, I have had the complete opposite during these 8 weeks.  After writing my first post, I had a very difficult week.  I was moving up from .5mg by .25mg every 5-7 days.  I had started to take LDN in the morning, upon waking at 7:30am because I had gotten warnings at the medicine causing insomnia which is not something I wanted to experience.

Some Ups and Downs

About two weeks ago, at 1.5mg or so, I had five days in a row where I was depressed (ready to give up using LDN), tired, and my pain levels (6-7) were higher than before LDN. I was so discouraged. I had read of the Rebound Effect that LDN created, but I really had no idea what it meant.  Fortunately, on the 5th day, I saw someone discuss this on the LDN Facebook group.  Her explanation about the blocking of endorphins made so much sense and now what others had said to me about taking it before bed became clear.  I was experiencing the blocked-receptor symptoms during my wake hours, thus causing elevated pain, depression, and exhaustion!

Rebooting Endorphine Receptors

I went off from LDN for 36 hours, starting again with 1.5 at 9:00 pm. Ever since that switch, I’ve been doing pretty well, and I’m actually sleeping okay without taking anything else. I’m waking up a couple of times, but I have been able to go back to sleep fairly readily.  I’ve been able to have my granddaughter over and play for much of the day.  Today, in a race with her from our community garden to home, I actually ran three or so blocks without feeling like a rusted Tin Man struggling to move.

Moving Forward

I’m continuing to titrate up at this point.  As they say, I need to find my “sweet spot”.  I’m not fully sure what that will look like, so it may take some back and forth in dosages for a while.  Higher isn’t necessarily better.  Due to metabolism, I need to find the dose that blocks while I’m sleeping and gives me the full rebound effect while I’m awake.  I don’t believe I’m there yet.  If I take too high of a dose for my body, then I’ll be in blocked mode for too long of a time, which will bring on the opposite effect for what I need. 

LDN Resources:

 I will continue to update you as to my progress.  I’m not “there” yet for sure and am not sure how long that will take.  Some have reported reaching their personal full results at 6 months or even a year.  They say to hang in for at least 8 weeks, which I have done and certainly am having wonderful results at this point. If you have questions or stories about LDN, I welcome them.  I am not a doctor, obviously, but I can give you direction to people who are and speak to my own experience.

Thank you for visiting my blog today. 

I am committing to posting once a week on Fridays.  

However, as you know, my new normal means that sometimes I have to listen to my body and am not able to follow through as planned.  Thank you for your understanding.


According to my granddaughter, “Sharing is Caring.” 🙂